Air Bridge Cargo B747-8 Landing at Leipzig/Halle Airport (Germany)

Although the latest addition to Boeing's 747-family, the 747-8, has been in service for some years by now, it still is a bit of a highlight for plane spotters, so it was a nice surprise to find that AirBridgeCargo (RU/ABW) used one of their 747-8s on their route to Leipzig/Halle airport (LEJ/EDDP) that day.

The aircraft shown is VQ-BRH, a Boeing 747-8F (MSN 37669) that first flew in 2012, just to be stored in the desert, still owned by Boeing, before being delivered to AirBridgeCargo in September 2013. It can be seen here landing at runway 26R at Leipzig/Halle airport.

Another noteworthy little story happens in the background of this video: about 44 seconds into the video, you can see an Airbus A320 taxiing. This aircraft is LZ-FBD, which I captured about 1 month earlier (see https://youtu.be/aTJsdWyELxQ), back then with its vertical stabilizer completely in white, like pretty much the rest of the plane, but here you can see Onur Air, for which this plane is flying at the moment, have added their logo in the meantime!

More videos from 2015:
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More videos showing Boeing aircraft:
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More videos from Leipzig/Halle airport:
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Obwohl das neueste Mitglied der 747-Familie von Boeing, die 747-8, bereits seit einigen Jahren im Einsatz ist, stellt dieses Modell doch immer noch ein Highlight für Planespotter dar. Deshalb war es eine angenehme Überraschung für mich, festzustellen, das AirBridgeCargo (RU/ABW) an diesem Tag eine 747-8 auf ihrer Strecke zum Flughafen Leipzig/Halle (LEJ/EDDP) eingesetzt hatte.

Die gezeigte Maschine ist VQ-BRH, eine Boeing 747-8F (MSN 37669) die ihren Erstflug im Jahr 2012 hatte, nur um zunächst - immer noch im Besitz von Boeing - in der Wüste abgestellt zu werden, bevor sie im September 2013 an AirBridgeCargo ausgeliefert wurde. Sie ist hier bei der Landung auf der Piste 26R des Flughafens Leipzig/Halle zu sehen.

Eine weiter kleine, aber beachtenswerte Geschichte, findet sich im Hintergrund dieses Videos. Bei etwa 0:44, kann man kurz einen Airbus A320 rollen sehen. Bei dieser Maschine handelt es sich um LZ-FBD, die ich etwa einen Monat zuvor gefilmt hatte, damals noch mit einem Seitenleitwerk - wie eigentlich der Rest der Maschine auch - ganz in weiß (siehe https://youtu.be/aTJsdWyELxQ). Hier jedoch ist zu sehen, dass Onur Air, die Gesellschaft für die diese Maschine im Moment fliegt, inzwischen ihr Logo auf das Seitenleitwerk lackiert hat!

Weitere Videos von 2015:
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Weitere Videos, die Maschinen des Herstellers Boeing zeigen:
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Weitere Videos vom Flughafen Leipzig/Halle:
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Random YouTube Video Generator

 This site provides links to random videos hosted at YouTube, with the emphasis on random.

 The original idea for this site actually stemmed from another idea to provide a way of benchmarking the popularity of a video against the general population of YouTube videos. There are probably sites that do this by now, but there wasn’t when we started out. Anyway, in order to figure out how popular any one video is, you need a pretty large sample of videos to rank it against. The challenge is that the sample needs to be very random in order to properly rank a video and YouTube doesn’t appear to provide a way to obtain large numbers of random video IDs.

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 YouTube is an American video-sharing website headquartered in San Bruno, California. YouTube allows users to upload, view, rate, share, add to playlists, report, comment on videos, and subscribe to other users. It offers a wide variety of user-generated and corporate media videos. Available content includes video clips, TV show clips, music videos, short and documentary films, audio recordings, movie trailers, live streams, and other content such as video blogging, short original videos, and educational videos. Most content on YouTube is uploaded by individuals, but media corporations including CBS, the BBC, Vevo, and Hulu offer some of their material via YouTube as part of the YouTube partnership program. Unregistered users can only watch videos on the site, while registered users are permitted to upload an unlimited number of videos and add comments to videos. Videos deemed potentially inappropriate are available only to registered users affirming themselves to be at least 18 years old.

 YouTube and selected creators earn advertising revenue from Google AdSense, a program which targets ads according to site content and audience. The vast majority of its videos are free to view, but there are exceptions, including subscription-based premium channels, film rentals, as well as YouTube Music and YouTube Premium, subscription services respectively offering premium and ad-free music streaming, and ad-free access to all content, including exclusive content commissioned from notable personalities. As of February 2017, there were more than 400 hours of content uploaded to YouTube each minute, and one billion hours of content being watched on YouTube every day. As of August 2018, the website is ranked as the second-most popular site in the world, according to Alexa Internet, just behind Google. As of May 2019, more than 500 hours of video content are uploaded to YouTube every minute.

 YouTube has faced criticism over aspects of its operations, including its handling of copyrighted content contained within uploaded videos, its recommendation algorithms perpetuating videos that promote conspiracy theories and falsehoods, hosting videos ostensibly targeting children but containing violent and/or sexually suggestive content involving popular characters, videos of minors attracting pedophilic activities in their comment sections, and fluctuating policies on the types of content that is eligible to be monetized with advertising.

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