Shayna Hubers Murder Trial, Freddie Gray Death + Alzheimer's Sexual Abuse Case - YoutubeRandom

Shayna Hubers Murder Trial, Freddie Gray Death + Alzheimer's Sexual Abuse Case

The Shayna Hubers murder trial and the Baltimore police custody death of Freddie Gray are discussed in detail with former criminal prosecutor Loni Coombs. We also look at the case of Iowa man Henry Rayhons who was found not guilty of sexually abusing his wife, who had Alzheimer’s disease, the FBI flawed hair analysis testimonies spanning decades, and whether or not the Aaron Hernandez verdict has grounds for appeal, in this uncensored Crime Time episode hosted by Allison Hope Weiner.

GUEST BIO:
Loni Coombs attended Brigham Young University, graduating at the age of nineteen with a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a minor in philosophy and music. In 1988, after graduating from Pepperdine Law School, Loni began her legal career as a criminal trial prosecutor for the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office. Her numerous felony trials ranged from murders to sex crimes and DUIs. From 2003 to 2005, Loni headed up the District Attorney’s Hate Crimes Unit, monitoring discrimination cases throughout the county and training law enforcement agencies.

In 2006, Ms. Coombs transitioned into the broadcast world as a legal analyst for national and local broadcast outlets, including CNN, Court TV (now TruTV), Extra, The View, Entertainment Tonight, and KTLA. Loni covered various trials including Phil Spector, OJ Simpson, Mel Gibson, Warren Jeffs, and Casey Anthony. Her daily coverage of the Phil Spector trial on KTLA.com earned her an AP award. Loni anchored newscasts (KTLA’s Prime News, KDOC’s Daybreak OC), co-hosted talk shows (KTLA’s 9 am Morning Show, Fox’s San Diego Living), and reported from the field (KTLA’s Morning News and Prime News). Loni appears as a regular contributor on “Dr. Phil”, “The Doctors”, and "Dr. Drew."

ADD’L LINKS:
http://thelip.tv
http://thelip.tv/show/crime-time/
Crime Time Full Episodes Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFzxeXjIbdw&index=1&list=PLjk3H0GXhhGfIvJXM3emqDXkZ02SXgfgT
Crime Time Shorts Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PD_265iHdZo&list=PLjk3H0GXhhGeC9DbpSnIvd2i9BHh2dBvv&index=1
https://www.facebook.com/CrimeTimeWithAllisonHopeWeiner?directed_target_id=0
https://www.facebook.com/thelip.tv

EPISODE BREAKDOWN:
00:00 Welcome Loni Coombs to Crime Time.
00:56 Watch: Shayna saying why she shot Posen again.
02:25 Is this another case like Jodi Arias?
05:21 Shayna’s cellmates come forward about what she said in jail.
07:00 Claims of abuse and drug abuse and any evidence.
08:45 Texting and social media’s role in the case.
09:47 Post-traumatic stress claims.
10:35 Needing to prove claims of self defense.
12:45 What are the implications of this case on the treatment of those with Alzheimer’s?
15:55 Nursing homes changing protocol on how to deal with Alzheimer’s patients.
17:50 Prosecution believed the wife was a non-person.
18:55 A money grab from the two daughters.
21:53 Video: Freddie Gray with Police.
22:45 How Baltimore has handled the death of Freddie Gray.
24:50 What hap...

Random YouTube Video Generator

 This site provides links to random videos hosted at YouTube, with the emphasis on random.

 The original idea for this site actually stemmed from another idea to provide a way of benchmarking the popularity of a video against the general population of YouTube videos. There are probably sites that do this by now, but there wasn’t when we started out. Anyway, in order to figure out how popular any one video is, you need a pretty large sample of videos to rank it against. The challenge is that the sample needs to be very random in order to properly rank a video and YouTube doesn’t appear to provide a way to obtain large numbers of random video IDs.

 Even if you search on YouTube for a random string, the set of results that will be returned will still be based on popularity, so if you’re using this approach to build up your sample, you’re already in trouble. It turns out there is a multitude of ways in which the YouTube search function makes it very difficult to retrieve truly random results.

 So how can we provide truly random links to YouTube videos? It turns out that the YouTube programming interface (API) provides additional functions that allow the discovery of videos which, with the right approach, are much more random. Using a number of tricks, combined some subtle manipulation of the space-time fabric, we have managed to create a process that yields something very close to 100% random links to YouTube videos.

 YouTube is an American video-sharing website headquartered in San Bruno, California. YouTube allows users to upload, view, rate, share, add to playlists, report, comment on videos, and subscribe to other users. It offers a wide variety of user-generated and corporate media videos. Available content includes video clips, TV show clips, music videos, short and documentary films, audio recordings, movie trailers, live streams, and other content such as video blogging, short original videos, and educational videos. Most content on YouTube is uploaded by individuals, but media corporations including CBS, the BBC, Vevo, and Hulu offer some of their material via YouTube as part of the YouTube partnership program. Unregistered users can only watch videos on the site, while registered users are permitted to upload an unlimited number of videos and add comments to videos. Videos deemed potentially inappropriate are available only to registered users affirming themselves to be at least 18 years old.

 YouTube and selected creators earn advertising revenue from Google AdSense, a program which targets ads according to site content and audience. The vast majority of its videos are free to view, but there are exceptions, including subscription-based premium channels, film rentals, as well as YouTube Music and YouTube Premium, subscription services respectively offering premium and ad-free music streaming, and ad-free access to all content, including exclusive content commissioned from notable personalities. As of February 2017, there were more than 400 hours of content uploaded to YouTube each minute, and one billion hours of content being watched on YouTube every day. As of August 2018, the website is ranked as the second-most popular site in the world, according to Alexa Internet, just behind Google. As of May 2019, more than 500 hours of video content are uploaded to YouTube every minute.

 YouTube has faced criticism over aspects of its operations, including its handling of copyrighted content contained within uploaded videos, its recommendation algorithms perpetuating videos that promote conspiracy theories and falsehoods, hosting videos ostensibly targeting children but containing violent and/or sexually suggestive content involving popular characters, videos of minors attracting pedophilic activities in their comment sections, and fluctuating policies on the types of content that is eligible to be monetized with advertising.

By using our services, you agree to our Privacy Policy.
Powered by Wildsbet.

© 2022 YoutubeRandom