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Immunotherapy: A Look at the Year Ahead for 2019

In this webinar for patients and caregivers, Elizabeth M. Jaffee, M.D., discusses the remarkable immunotherapy breakthroughs of 2018 and efforts to enable immunotherapy to benefit even more people with cancer in 2019. #CRIwebinar #immunotherapy

2018 was a big year for cancer immunotherapy. In addition to several approvals of checkpoint immunotherapies for new cancer types, combinations strategies involving these treatments were approved as first-line options in two cancer types and showed promise in clinical trials for several hard-to-treat cancers.

Important advances were also made with respect to immune-related biomarkers, cellular immunotherapies, and personalized vaccines.

In this webinar for patients and caregivers, Elizabeth M. Jaffee, M.D., covers these remarkable immunotherapy breakthroughs from the past year and discusses the field’s ongoing efforts to overcome the challenges ahead and enable immunotherapy to benefit even more people with cancer.

Elizabeth M. Jaffee, M.D., currently works at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, where she holds many prestigious positions, including serving as the deputy director of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, the associate director of the Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, the Dana and Albert “Cubby” Broccoli professor of oncology, co-director of gastrointestinal cancer and diseases program, and co-director of the Skip Viragh Center for Pancreas Cancer Clinical Research and Patient Care.

Outside of Johns Hopkins, Dr. Jaffee also currently serves as the chair of the National Cancer Advisory Board for the National Cancer Institute, the co-chair of the National Cancer Institute Blue Ribbon Panel for the National Cancer Moonshot Initiative, the leader of the Stand Up To Cancer-Lustgarten Foundation Pancreatic Cancer Dream Team, and the president of the American Association for Cancer Research, among other roles. Dr. Jaffee has received numerous awards in recognition of her contributions, including the AACR Joseph H. Burchenal Memorial Award for Outstanding Achievement in Clinical Cancer Research in 2015 and the Johns Hopkins University Office of Women in Science and Medicine Vice Dean’s Award in 2012. She is a member of the Cancer Research Institute Scientific Advisory Council.

The "Cancer Immunotherapy and You" webinar series is produced by the Cancer Research Institute and is hosted by our science writer, Arthur Brodsky, Ph.D. The 2019 series is made possible with generous support from Bristol-Myers Squibb and Cellectis.

Browse our Cancer Immunotherapy and You Webinar Series playlist on YouTube or visit the Webinars page on our website to see other webinars in this series. https://www.cancerresearch.org/events/webinars

The "Cancer Immunotherapy and You" webinar series is part of Cancer Research Institute's Answer to Cancer Patient Education Program. Established in 1953, the Cancer Research Institute (CRI) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to harnessing our immune system’s power to control and potentially cure all cancers. Our mission: Save more lives by fueling the discovery and development of powerful immunotherapies for all types of cancer. To accomplish this, we rely on donor support and collaborative partnerships to fund and carry out the most innovative clinical and laboratory research around the world, support the next generation of the field’s leaders, and serve as the trusted source of information on immunotherapy for cancer patients and their caregivers. https://www.cancerresearch.org

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Random YouTube Videos Generator

 This site provides links to random videos hosted at YouTube, with the emphasis on random.

 The original idea for this site actually stemmed from another idea to provide a way of benchmarking the popularity of a video against the general population of YouTube videos. There are probably sites that do this by now, but there wasn’t when we started out. Anyway, in order to figure out how popular any one video is, you need a pretty large sample of videos to rank it against. The challenge is that the sample needs to be very random in order to properly rank a video and YouTube doesn’t appear to provide a way to obtain large numbers of random video IDs.

Alternative random YouTube videos generator: vTomb

 Even if you search on YouTube for a random string, the set of results that will be returned will still be based on popularity, so if you’re using this approach to build up your sample, you’re already in trouble. It turns out there is a multitude of ways in which the YouTube search function makes it very difficult to retrieve truly random results.

 So how can we provide truly random links to YouTube videos? It turns out that the YouTube programming interface (API) provides additional functions that allow the discovery of videos which, with the right approach, are much more random. Using a number of tricks, combined some subtle manipulation of the space-time fabric, we have managed to create a process that yields something very close to 100% random links to YouTube videos.

 YouTube is an American video-sharing website headquartered in San Bruno, California. YouTube allows users to upload, view, rate, share, add to playlists, report, comment on videos, and subscribe to other users. It offers a wide variety of user-generated and corporate media videos. Available content includes video clips, TV show clips, music videos, short and documentary films, audio recordings, movie trailers, live streams, and other content such as video blogging, short original videos, and educational videos. Most content on YouTube is uploaded by individuals, but media corporations including CBS, the BBC, Vevo, and Hulu offer some of their material via YouTube as part of the YouTube partnership program. Unregistered users can only watch videos on the site, while registered users are permitted to upload an unlimited number of videos and add comments to videos. Videos deemed potentially inappropriate are available only to registered users affirming themselves to be at least 18 years old.

 YouTube and selected creators earn advertising revenue from Google AdSense, a program which targets ads according to site content and audience. The vast majority of its videos are free to view, but there are exceptions, including subscription-based premium channels, film rentals, as well as YouTube Music and YouTube Premium, subscription services respectively offering premium and ad-free music streaming, and ad-free access to all content, including exclusive content commissioned from notable personalities. As of February 2017, there were more than 400 hours of content uploaded to YouTube each minute, and one billion hours of content being watched on YouTube every day. As of August 2018, the website is ranked as the second-most popular site in the world, according to Alexa Internet, just behind Google. As of May 2019, more than 500 hours of video content are uploaded to YouTube every minute.

 YouTube has faced criticism over aspects of its operations, including its handling of copyrighted content contained within uploaded videos, its recommendation algorithms perpetuating videos that promote conspiracy theories and falsehoods, hosting videos ostensibly targeting children but containing violent and/or sexually suggestive content involving popular characters, videos of minors attracting pedophilic activities in their comment sections, and fluctuating policies on the types of content that is eligible to be monetized with advertising.

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